Galvin Bistrot de Luxe’s birthday

Rain in the summer in London is a real pain because even if it looks cold outside, it’s really not. Rather, it’s muggy and humid and when I get to wherever I’m going, I’m all hot and sweaty because I overdressed. Such was the case as I arrived at Galvin’s Bistrot De Luxe for a pre-birthday dinner a few weeks ago. Galvin had just the thing to cool me down as I joined everyone else at the dinner table. Sipping on a French 75, the house aperitif for the month of September in celebration of their birthday, was just the ticket. Galvin has taken the classic cocktail and put a twist on it, originally made with champagne, gin, lemon juice and sugar, they’ve substituted the gin for calvados which gave it a nice apple-y twist. Hosted by Sara Galvin, we were there to take a trip down memory lane to five years previous and sample the menu as it was then. On the menu for dinner were some originals from 5 years ago. Starting with the terrine of ham hock & foie gras with onion confit, a very tasty, meaty slab of terrine, it was paired with an Alsatian riesling, the Brandluft 2006 from Dom. Lucas & Andre Rieffel. I love most rieslings and think they are great food wines. The Brandluft did not disappoint, a classic nose of spices, limes and riverside minerality with plenty of ripe peaches on the palate and a refreshing limey finish. A fruity but dry wine, it worked a quite well with the sweetness of the ham, score another one for riesling. A Corbieres was next, the 2008 Ch. Ollieux-Romanis. A blend of carignan, syrah and grenache it’s a big, powerful wine. Carignan is always a signal for rather muscular wines to my mind and this was definitely in that category. Blackberries and fruits on the nose and palate with excellent structure, a wine that was suited to the Pithivier of wood pigeon & quail that we had...

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Chatting with Jean Trimbach

Some of my favourite wines are from Alsace. I absolutely adore those gewurztraminers and rieslings  that can really only be produced at the foot of the France’s Vosges Mountains. I’ve talked about Hugel and now it’s that other big Alsatian hitter, Trimbach. Trimbach have been producing their wines since the 1600’s and specialize in riesling. I was at a dinner  not long ago at Trinity restaurant in Clapham for a pig masterclass and wine matching evening. The food was expertly matched by chef Adam Byatt. Adam walked us through how to butcher a side a pig. For a very thorough write up of the food we had, please check out Eatlikeagirl’s post here. As for me, The Winesleuth, I was able to chat with Jean Trimbach, the 13th generation of Trimbach, about their special Cuvee Frederic Emile riesling which was made in honor of the 375th anniversary of the founding of Trimbach. Click on the video to see what Jean has to say about the quintessential Trimbach riesling Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInPocketRedditGoogleTumblrEmailPrintPinterestLike this:Like...

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What a year it’s been! So long 2009, Hello 2010…

I’m not really one to look back, I’m either daydreaming about the future or looking forward to tonight’s wine – more or less the same thing. But I saw one of Niamh’s tweets about her year-end round-up and it got me to reminiscing about my vinous adventures this past  year. The great thing about a blog – I’ve got a record of many of my favourite drinking adventures. Not all of them mind you, because many I just never got around to blogging about but I did manage to put up almost 120 blog posts this year! I would have done more but I was computer-less over the summer after my laptop was stolen in June. This was definitely the year that The Winesleuth embraced video in all it’s gory messiness. Whether the videos made any sense, well, I’ll let you decide but I sure did have a lot of fun making them. I’d like to get a bit more creative in 2010 and maybe even, dare I say it, a bit more professional. My favourites of the year include ones I made with my good friend and fellow wineblogger Wine90 – she just cracks me up. Here we’re reviewing the Balfour Brut Rose…. But Bibendum Dan was another excellent foil, here we are talking about hairy armpit wines… Fun events, as when Catavino came to town and their winetasting at Vinoteca… [viddler id=74e84e69&w=437&h=333] or the Naked Wines Argentine wine auction….. [viddler id=f70e4865&w=437&h=392] and then there’s just amusing and charming winemakers…Etienne Hugel of the Alsatian winemaker Hugel & Fils… [viddler id=9fe1ae3d&w=437&h=392] and Neil McGuigan of the Australian McGuigan Vineyards, to name a few… [viddler id=49575c47&w=437&h=392] And, of course, the vids of my wine reviews, my favourite has to be one I did in S. Carolina while I was on holiday – every time I see it, it reminds me of what a great holiday I had… Of course there was Twitter as well and the Foodies, most especially Eatlikeagirl with whom I did the...

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Chatting with Etienne Hugel & his fab gewurztraminer

Back before I really knew anything about wine, I do remember scanning the shelves of my local wine shop and the the striking yellow label. No, I’m not talking about Yellow Tail, I’m talking about the yellow label from Alsace, Hugel’s yellow label. The house of Hugel has been making wine in Alsace since 1639, I don’t even know if Australia had been found yet by Capt. Cook or whoever it was that stumbled upon that continent but Hugel were making their rieslings and gewurztraminers way back then. I grabbed  the 12th generation of Hugel to be running the family firm, the charming and amusing Etienne Hugel, at the recent Fells Portfolio tasting in central London for a quick chat. Although Etienne had the entire range on display and I did try a  fair few of them, we compared notes on  what Etienne considers to be Alsace’s and his family’s flagship wine, the Hugel gewurztraminer. Here we are chatting about the latest vintage and the difference between young and old gewurz… [viddler id=9fe1ae3d&w=437&h=392] Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInPocketRedditGoogleTumblrEmailPrintPinterestLike this:Like...

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