Cuisson’s Pop-Down supper club

Jun 22, 15 Cuisson’s Pop-Down supper club

Posted by in All

Pop-up’s are everywhere nowadays but how about a pop-down? The concept is really a play on words as the events take place in the basement of Borough Barista, an independent coffee shop in St.James.  The dinners were created by luxury gastronomy experts, Cuisson and the POP-Down will be open Thursday-Saturday evening throughout the summer. Moving away from the usual supper club concept, POP-Down promises to deliver inventive, high-end dining at affordable prices. Despite being downstairs, the venue has a welcoming vibe and the kitchen is open for everyone to watch the chefs at work. We were also invited to help with the plating up of the food but it seems most of us were more interested in taking pictures for Instagram then in plating up food. But, what do you expect from a supperclub? As an added bonus, the chefs would come round and have a chat about what we were eating and any feedback or questions that we might have had about the food. The food was delicious and plated up innovatively. I really enjoyed the potatoes rolled in burnt hay with garlic sauce to start. The sous vide salmon was melt in your mouth good. I was a bit apprehensive of the sous vide salmon but I could have easily had another plate. The chicken parfait was a tower of pate and we all loved the platter of desserts, especially the pop rock garnish for one of the desserts. There was also a separate dessert bar which we didn’t try but all of the desserts featured in the bar were on our platter. The dinners will be held every Thursday, Friday, Saturday from 7.30pm onwards. Tickets are priced at £39 for 4 courses and are available to purchase in advance through Grubclub.Three courses at POP-Down Dessert Bar are priced at £25 For more information visit their website, http://www.cuisson.co.uk/     Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInPocketRedditGoogleTumblrEmailPrintPinterestLike this:Like...

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German wines at a Scandinavian supperclub

Feb 11, 13 German wines at a Scandinavian supperclub

Posted by in Food and Wine, German wine

Regular readers of my blog know that I like German wines. Whether they are mineral laden, acid streaked rieslings or fruity, medium bodied pinot noirs, I think they are still under-appreciated wines. German wines can be drunk as aperitifs or on their own but they really shine when they are paired with food. The Wines of Germany teamed up with Scandinavian cook book author Signe Johansen recently to prepare a menu of Norwegian food paired with German wines.That may sound a bit strange but when you consider that 1 in 4 bottles of wine sold in Norway is from Germany, then it begins to make a lot more sense. The cuisine of Norway – salty fish, sour pickled vegetables and fresh seafood are good companions to the the German wines. We started with a two rieslings and a lovely pinot noir paired with shrimp and fish roe on crispbread and spiced Norwegian veal & lamb meatballs. The Rechsgraf von Kasselstatt Riesling trocken 2011 (Mosel, £8.95) was off dry, full of ripe peachy fruit and a nice lean, lime finish. The other riesling, the Dr. Loosen Urziger Wurzgarten kabinett 2011 (Mosel £15.99) was, although labeled a kabinett, was very much more on the off-dry, almost spatlese side, I thought. Very fruity and round on the palate. Both wines have good acidity but I thought the Rechsgraf was a better match with the shrimp. It had a crisper, cleaner finish to it. The Palataia pinot noir 2011 (Pfalz £8.99) was probably one of my favorites of the evening. A definite crowd pleaser, full of soft ripe red berry fruit, a hint of smokiness with a smooth round mouthfeel, very morish and the acidity of the wine while not excessive, was enough to cut through the fat of the veal & lamb meatballs. Sashimi grade salmon was used for the starter of cured salmon with wild dill pollen, Scandinavian pickles and horseradish creme fraiche. The salmon was melt in your mouth good, extremely velvety but full of flavour....

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Global Feast 2012 – culinary trip around the world

Jul 29, 12 Global Feast 2012 – culinary trip around the world

Posted by in Austria, Food and Wine

I went to a rather interesting dinner over the weekend. It’s called Global Feast and the premise is over 20 days, the event will feature a cuisine from 20 regions around the world. Global Feast is also featuring chefs and supper club owners each night, many of them flying in specifically for the event. Besides all that, the main feature is the table. The night I went, it wasn’t finished yet but when it’s done, it will be a world map, called a Worldscape. In a nutshell, it’s a “sculptural geographical landscape” based on NASA’s digital map of  the world. I wasn’t really sure how to make heads or tails of it, even after it had been explained to us but I do remember it having something to do with the holes in the tables representing the population densities of the world, hence in the Indian and Chinese parts of the world, there wasn’t much table top(! )and the sculptures standing on the table represented the height of mountains and other geographical landscapes. I’d like to go back and see it when it’s completely constructed. But anyway, back to the food. It was Northern Europe’s turn the evening I attended and Swedish Chef Linn Soderstrom was in residence along with London supperclub owner Claudia Stachelhaus. We started with some lovely canapes of garlicky cucumber gazpacho and crispy flatbread direct from Sweden with prawns in mayo and dill –  the prawns were served with an edible daisy, quite tasty. I like edible flowers. I could have also eaten the whole platter of that flatbread starter. A very tasty starter of herring with beetroot and brown butter mayonnaise, paired with the 2010 Rabl gruner veltliner was first at dinner.  I liked the gruner, dry with white pepper and mineral notes. I also detected a bit of hay in there. However, one of my dining companions had some of the Italian Folonari  pinot grigio rose left from earlier in the evening and I thought the red fruits...

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Wine(sleuth) and (London) Food(ie) matching supper club

So the London Foodie and I put on a supper club not long ago. How did that happen? And more importantly, how did it go? Luiz and I were sitting around one evening, shooting the breeze and imbibing a delicious red Rhone. “We should do a dinner with food and wine matching!” One of us always says that whenever we start drinking the vino but we never get around to actually picking a date. This time was different. “Let’s pick a date and do it,” I said. Goading Luiz on, he jumped on the laptop and put up a post right then and there announcing our supper club date. Next morning – “uh-oh.” Luiz came up with a menu in two seconds but me, well…better get thinking about what to match with Japanese (!) cuisine. Japanese food is notoriously difficult to pair with wine and for some reason we decided to call the evening ” French wine and Japanese food” in our wine haze. I love champagne and honestly, it does work so very well with  Japanese cuisine so a quick email to Perrier Jouet and they offered up the Mumm NV rosé for one of our courses. I paired it with the starter of tuna tataki with yuzu dressing. Rosé champagne is great with food, sometimes even better then non-rosé champagne. Everyone was surprised and delighted to be served bubbles in the middle of a meal. The rest of the menu featured still table wines from my friends over at DVine Wine. Greg and co. are big on sustainable, organic and biodynamic wines and I was impressed by their range when I worked with them on a recent market stall. I chose a 2010 sauvignon blanc from Guy Allion in the Loire. A elderflower and gooseberry flavoured wine, a great aperitif and paired with the canapes of Yakitori Chicken, Peppers and Baby Leek in Teriyaki Sauce and sushi, everyone commented on what a delight the wine was both by itself and with the...

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Falanghina & Auchentoshan for a Shacklewell Night

Sep 05, 11 Falanghina & Auchentoshan for a Shacklewell Night

Posted by in Food and Wine, Italy, Spirits

Walking up Kingsland Road and then merging onto Stoke Newington Street, I was wondering if I would ever find the venue for Shacklewell Nights’ latest dinner. Past rows of closed shops with the metal shutters locked tightly, Turkish grocers and off-licences, I spied a hipster with a clipboard in the battered open doorway of what seemed to be a long closed establishment. This had to be it. And it was. After making my way past the entry room, it opened up into a (covered) still surviving Victorian street, (awesome!) complete with dwellings on both sides of the street, one serving as an open kitchen. Aperitifs and dinner was served in Ruby House, which was across the street from the kitchen, and is set over 5 floors of a Victorian townhouse, with plenty of retro furnishings and faded grandeur.  The entire venue is known as MC Motors and is very shabby chic. Auchentoshan was one of the sponsors and we got plenty of single malt whiskey cocktails before setting down to dinner. Shacklewell were serving roast chicken and I was asked by the organizers to recommend a red and white wine with dinner. I chose the 2010 Terradora Falanghina to go with the chicken. Falanghina is one of the easier to pronounce Italian varietals, coming from the slopes of Vesuvius, it is one of favourite white wines. Falanghina is a wine made for food, full of minerality but having good structure and plenty of apple, quince and citrus notes. It is rather round on the palate but not oily more like a substantial, elegantly textured white wine and miles better then any pinot grigio. A good match with the roast chicken, I enjoyed it with the starter of langoustine as well, the wine’s citrusy character coming to the forefront. In the middle of dinner, we were escorted, table by table, to a circa 1930’s decorated basement bar to sample Auchentoshan whiskey and learn a bit about the history of the whiskey. Luckily, we weren’t left...

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