Featured Post – Exploring the World’s Greatest Wine Regions

Oct 24, 13 Featured Post – Exploring the World’s Greatest Wine Regions

Posted by in All, Featured Post

Exploring the world’s greatest wine regions… France, Italy and Spain are the top three wine countries in the world, producing almost half of the world’s wine – but that doesn’t necessarily mean you should only visit wine regions within these countries. Wine is produced all over the world and so it can be very difficult to decide where to go to sample to the best wines on holiday, especially if you’re a beginner whose passion for wine has only just begun. Here Columbus Direct takes a look at some of world’s greatest wine regions and what you can expect from each one… Bordeaux, France It is likely that even the most novice of wine lovers know that Bordeaux is generally considered one of, if not the greatest wine region in the world. Bordeaux boasts around 284,320 acres of vineyards, producing a huge variety of grapes including Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc. If you’re a lover of red wine in particular, you certainly won’t be disappointed, as around 75 to 80 per cent of the wine produced there is red. Bordeaux is also famous for making some of the most expensive and prized wines – though that doesn’t mean you have to spend a lot when you’re over there. Wine tours are pretty inexpensive and there are plenty of wines available at reasonable prices, so don’t think it’s out of your price range. Napa Valley, California Napa Valley is considered to house the greatest collection of wineries in America, despite the fact it only produces around four per cent of California’s wine. Size wise, the region is about an eighth of the size of Bordeaux, yet there are around 220 wine producers here and around 95 per cent of them are family-run businesses. Napa Valley creates a wide variety of premium grapes – including Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Zinfandel and Merlot, among others. There are certainly enough different types here to keep wine lovers of all kinds happy. Maipo Valley, Chile Maipo Valley is the most established wine region in Chile, it’s most famous grape is Cabernet Sauvignon but Merlot and Pinot Noir grapes are also...

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Chianti Classico ’05

Chianti. Cheap and cheerful, comes in a wicker covered bottle, which, when empty, make handy candle holders. Well, that might be the old image of Chianti, and you can probably still buy that type of wine, but last weekend we had a tasting of Chianti Classico at the shop to dispel those hoary old myths and a bit of food and wine pairing with Italian salami and mature English cheddar. Chianti is the name of the region in Italy where the wine is from, not the name of the grape. The Italians like to confuse us as much as the French when it comes to naming their wines. There are two types of Chianti, Chianti and Chianti Classico (click here for more info). Chianti Classico is the oldest region, located in the heart of Tuscany. Chianti is made up of primarily the varietal sangiovese with the local varieties canaiolo and colorino also used in the blend. Up to 20% can be added in Chianti Classico and 25% in Chianti. There are all sorts of rules and regulations governing the production and making of Chianti (click here if you’re really interested) but I’m going to focus on the three we had on Saturday. First up was a Chianti, for a bit of compare and contrast, the ’06 Veduta, a blend of sangiovese and canaiolo, spending 3 months in large oak barrels, produced by the Casa Girelli, one of Italy’s largest privately owned wineries who produce 95% of their wine for the overseas market. This was an easy, approachable red, a simple, uncomplicated, red fruit nose followed by bright cherry and lively tannins on the palate. It had a short, slightly green finish. A good guzzler to go with a cheesy Saturday nite pizza. Then we moved onto the Classicos. What a world of difference. Everyone who tried the Veduta liked it until they tried the Classico. Piave di Spaltenna ’05 was the first classico. The vineyards are situated in the heart of the oldest district...

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A bit of Italian for dinner

Remole by Frescobaldi What to have with dinner tonight is the perennial question. You could go with the old tried and true Aussie something or other or cheap new world red or white but what about Italy? I went to an Italian tasting not long ago and they are coming up in leaps and bounds. So, the other day, when I was staring at the wall of wine in the shop, I gravitated toward Italy and picked up this little number from Tuscany. Remole is a blend of sangiovese with a touch of cabernet to give it a bit of colour and heft. On pouring, it gave off aromas of cherry and red berry fruits, very clear, ruby red in colour. On pouring it down my throat, more of that cherry goodness with a mix of juicy strawberry, ripe cherry, a blackcurrant backdrop and a hint of brambly pepper with a dark chocolate finish. Delicious. We had BBQ chicken, spicy couscous and hummous with this and it was a perfect palate cleanser between each bite. Fresh and fruity just begging me to take another bite, which is what any good food wine should do. Wine Stats: Year: 2006 Alcohol: 12.5% Region: IGT Tuscany Varietal(s): blend of Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon Retail price: £6.99 In a nutshell: fruity red for dinner Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInPocketRedditGoogleTumblrEmailPrintPinterestLike this:Like...

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