A Rose night in Soho…

Apr 23, 12 A Rose night in Soho…

Posted by in Food and Wine, France

There’s something about a glass of rosé from Provence that is so pleasing to the eye, a seductive quality in it’s shimmering hues that makes me just want to dive right in. I remember when I was first introduced to Provençal rosé, I was immediately smitten.  Professionally, we are trained to judge a wine by its colour but way before I got into the wine trade, I knew that there was something evocative and special about the rosés of Provence. Many British holiday-makers associate those pink tinged wines with long, lazy, hot summer days on the beaches of Southern France. Having grown up in California, I don’t, but they still have a siren call for me. Before you ask, no, I wasn’t hitting the rosé bottle before I sat down to write this post. I did, however, attend a dinner recently at Bistro du Vin Soho sponsored by Provence Wines, the generic body that promotes all wines Provençal. Wine has been made in Provence since 600 BC when the Greeks brought it over after colonizing the coast and founding Marseille. The Greeks were making wine long before the Romans had ever set foot in France, although, it was the Romans who spread the cultivation of vines to the Rhone and beyond. The first wines made by the Greeks were in fact a pale pink colour because at the time maceration was unknown and so the wines produced had little contact with the skins – just enough to give it a rosy shade. Wine making has progressed and we now have wines that come in various shades but the vignerons of Provence still carry on making their beautiful rosés. Provence is made up of 3 appellations, Côtes de Provence, Coteaux d’Aix-en-Provence and Coteaux Varois en Provence. The region itself produces 88% of all rosé produced in France with Côtes de Provence producing primarily rosé wine. There are more then a dozen varieties allowed in the production of rosé but the majority use a combination of grenache,...

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Ch. du L’engarran Rose

One of my colleagues, Tom from Fulham, decided to organize a day out in Hyde Park for all off us slogging away in the London shops. Somebody brought a football and an American football but really I was just there for the wine. Even though the sun is still playing hide and seek with us, Wed. was a brilliantly sunny day and the Ch. du L’Engarran rose that I brought was perfect for  a day out in the park. I really like these guys, or rather ladies. The Chateau is run by a feisty Frenchwoman, Francine and her two daughters. The Chateau has been seriously producing wine under Francine since the 60’s  but since it is an AOC Coteaux du Languedoc, it’s not as well known as it could be. So on to the rose. I  used to be one of those wine snobs who wouldn’t touch rose but now that I’ve discovered dry rose, I’m all for it, esp. the ones from Southern France. This particular one is a blend of granache and cinsault,  a pale, peachy salmon color which looks so inviting in the bottle and even more so in the glass. It’s a dry, fruity glugger. I got raspberry, cherry and strawberry on the nose, following thru  with more of the same on the palate. This was a nicely balanced rose, refreshing and tasty and at the same time finishing off with a bit of a citrusy zing. We all agreed that it was a perfect summer wine, with or without food. I think if I’d had a tuna nicoise to go along with it, the day would have been perfect. Next week is the International London Wine Fair. I can’t wait! Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInPocketRedditGoogleTumblrEmailPrintPinterestLike this:Like...

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